DUWAMISH HILL PRESERVE PHASE I & II | TUKWILA, WA   Owner/Client:  City of Tukwila  SvR Role:  Landscape Architecture & Civil Engineering  Construction Cost:  $500,000 (phase 1) + $700,000 (phase 2)  Start Date:  2008  End Date:  Ongoing  Duwamish Hill Preserve is a 9-acre nature park on an unusual outcropping of bedrock rising beside the Duwamish River. The property is culturally significant to the Muckleshoot and Duwamish tribes for its association with Southern Puget Sound Salish oral tradition and mythology. Working with the tribes, Forterra, and the City, SvR developed a master plan and detailed designs for the first phase, including trails, interpretives, viewpoints, and an outdoor classroom. Phase 1, above right, was constructed in 2009-2010.  Phase 2 of the Preserve, above left, is focused on the development of a living laboratory for traditional ecological knowledge. To be constructed in 2015, it will be a place to research and showcase how traditional indigenous landscape management practices impact and/or improve environmental conditions. City partners will monitor a series of habitat “cells” that host wetland, wet meadow, prairie and savannah vegetation. School groups and neighbors will walk amidst the cells and observe “designed experiments” comparing practices.   

DUWAMISH HILL PRESERVE PHASE I & II | TUKWILA, WA

Owner/Client: City of Tukwila
SvR Role: Landscape Architecture & Civil Engineering
Construction Cost: $500,000 (phase 1) + $700,000 (phase 2)
Start Date: 2008
End Date: Ongoing

Duwamish Hill Preserve is a 9-acre nature park on an unusual outcropping of bedrock rising beside the Duwamish River. The property is culturally significant to the Muckleshoot and Duwamish tribes for its association with Southern Puget Sound Salish oral tradition and mythology. Working with the tribes, Forterra, and the City, SvR developed a master plan and detailed designs for the first phase, including trails, interpretives, viewpoints, and an outdoor classroom. Phase 1, above right, was constructed in 2009-2010.

Phase 2 of the Preserve, above left, is focused on the development of a living laboratory for traditional ecological knowledge. To be constructed in 2015, it will be a place to research and showcase how traditional indigenous landscape management practices impact and/or improve environmental conditions. City partners will monitor a series of habitat “cells” that host wetland, wet meadow, prairie and savannah vegetation. School groups and neighbors will walk amidst the cells and observe “designed experiments” comparing practices.

 

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