NEWS

How to Make Your Own Native Plant, Bike Wheel Wreath

For our holiday card this year, we created a one of kind holiday wreathe using some of the tools of our trade: an old bike wheel and native plants harvested from our yards.  Even in the dead of winter, there are plenty of local, native plants that can be employed in our seasonal celebrations. So how did we do it? After securing an old bike wheel, we went looking for red-twig dogwoods (Cornus stolonifera) that had gotten a bit overgrown and harvested some of their branches, which stand out in the winter for their bright red color, and wove those through the spokes of the wheel until the rims disappeared. As accents, we arranged a few snowberries (Symphoricarpos albus) over cuttings of our native Oregon grape (Mahonia nervosa) and the ubiquitous sword fern (Polystichum munitum). And with that, a sustainable, recycled, locally-sourced holiday decoration.

For our holiday card this year, we created a one of kind holiday wreathe using some of the tools of our trade: an old bike wheel and native plants harvested from our yards.  Even in the dead of winter, there are plenty of local, native plants that can be employed in our seasonal celebrations. So how did we do it?

After securing an old bike wheel, we went looking for red-twig dogwoods (Cornus stolonifera) that had gotten a bit overgrown and harvested some of their branches, which stand out in the winter for their bright red color, and wove those through the spokes of the wheel until the rims disappeared.

As accents, we arranged a few snowberries (Symphoricarpos albus) over cuttings of our native Oregon grape (Mahonia nervosa) and the ubiquitous sword fern (Polystichum munitum).

And with that, a sustainable, recycled, locally-sourced holiday decoration.